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Photoshoot tips

Posted on 6th November 2015 by PROinsider

Do you want to move from salons to photoshoots? Well you need to read the advice below from stylists who are photoshoot pros. They’ve even revealed their essential products that can see you through any shoot anywhere.


 

Carrie Jones – manicurist

1. Double-ended cuticle pusher
“When you’re working on a photoshoot, you need to make sure your kit has everything you need, but taking every single product and tool is a no-no. That’s why tools that double up are perfect and they save space in your kit. This double-ended cuticle pusher is always in my kit. I use one side to push the cuticles down, and the other to scrape all the dead skin away.”

Try: ASP Dual Ended Cuticle Pusher

2. Glass nail file
“I always use a glass file rather than an emery board as it’s way smoother and leaves a much nicer finish.”

Try: Salon Services Glass Nail File

3. Muted shades
“For colours, I always keep a lot of neutrals and muted shades like greys, browns, beiges, peaches. When I started working on photoshoots, I would pack really bright and vibrant shades, but nine times out of ten, clients want to use subtle, muted shades, especially with the trends at the moment. Obviously, it’s important to pack a selection of brighter colours as seasons change, but neutral shades and classic reds are always a must.”

Try: ASP Signature Match Ups - Elements Collection

4. Seche Vite Dry Fast Top Coat
“For colours, I always keep a lot of neutrals and muted shades like greys, browns, beiges, peaches. When I started working on photoshoots, I would pack really bright and vibrant shades, but nine times out of ten, clients want to use subtle, muted shades, especially with the trends at the moment. Obviously, it’s important to pack a selection of brighter colours as seasons change, but neutral shades and classic reds are always a must.”
 

Advice

“I trained as a manicurist at the age of 16, and then I went on to work in salons for years. I then moved down to London to start a career in fashion. My advice to anyone who wants to start working on photoshoots, is to assist people as much as you can. Assisting is how you get your experience and you’ll create contacts by meeting people on shoots. When you’re starting out it is important to do a lot of free work, not to undercut your services, but you can volunteer to do nails on shoots when they wouldn’t have necessarily had a manicurist, so you can build your portfolio.”


John Christopher - MUA

1. Cleanser
“A good cleanser, especially a cleansing water as the models never complain about it because it’s so gentle on the skin, and it takes all the make up off.”

Try: Formula 10.0.6 So Totally Clean Sensitive

2. Moisturiser
A good moisturiser, something quite rich that suits all skin type.

Try: Nourishing Moisturiser - 200Ml

3. Foundation
Foundation or a bb cream depending on how much coverage you need.

Try: Lord & Berry Cream Foundation - 8621

4. Setting powder
A good setting powder, you have to remember that the model will be under hot lights so your make up need longevity.
Try: Lord & Berry Pressed Powder - 8106

5. Setting powder
A good mascara, because the eyes are usually the most important part of the make-up when working on photoshoots as it’s normally for adverts or magazine covers. With a good mascara you can easily make the eyes bigger and more intense.
Try: Alchimia Mascara Black - 1370

6. Lipstick
The final product key to any photoshoot is a lipstick, as it can be used on any part of the face. I’ve been on a job before where my kit didn’t turn up, and I had to go to a chemist to create my kit. It had a very simple make-up range, so I bought four lipsticks - a brown, beige, pink and a red one, and did the entire make up with those lippies. I used the beige and brown ones as a tan, the red on the lips, and the pink one for the blush.
Try: 20100 Lipstick - Intimacy
 

Advice for editorial photoshoots

“Start going round all of the agencies and start assisting people because you’ll learn more that way. By learning on the job, you’ll know how to interact with people, how to talk to clients, photographers, models, first AD and a director, which you can’t learn in college.”


Jake Unger, hair stylist

1. Hairdryer
“If you’re working on a shoot that involves several different looks, it’s important your hairdryer is really powerful when it comes to drying.

Try: Babyliss PRO Limited Edition Spectrum Hairdryer - Purple Haze

2. Tongs
Sometimes on a shoot, you might not get to see the model’s hair, so medium sized tongs are perfect.

Try: Diva Digital Argan Tong

3. Hairspray
Super strong hairspray and lots of it.

Try: Schwarzkopf Professional Silhouette Super Hold Hairspray

4. Serum
A serum to add shine and gloss, which will pick up under the lights.
Try: Wella Professionals Style Mirror Gloss
 

Advice

“Assist on anything as much as you can, message key agencies and offer your services for free. You’ll start at the lower end and slowly, slowly your work will start to be recognised, so the key is to assist, assist, assist, assist!”


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